Thursday, February 14, 2008

The new London gaz guzzler charges.....

..... that we commented upon the other day may not have quite the effect that TFL actually wants. This article from AutoWired argues that the "new emission-based London congestion charge rules are likely to increase CO2 emissions, increase pollution and increase congestion."

Given that the new charging system will target individual vehicle emissions, they suggest that "While encouraging the sales of low emission models is to be applauded, the framing of the new rules is likely to encourage greater use of cars within the capital". The consequences may be "significant numbers of charge-exempt models on the roads, potentially leading to higher carbon dioxide emissions, and more congestion"

Looks like repositioning a scaled congestion charge against individual vehicle emissions may not be quite as well thought out as TFL intended.





1 comment:

Peter said...

Well, there's the not so small matter of what TFL says it wants and actually is out to get.

Whilst noting the word 'suggests' it is no great surprise to find that the engineering is more social than environmental... again.

Trouble is, any system is fraught. Further to my last post on the situation, the most logical method of charging to mitigate CO2 is on what comes out the pipe, which in turn suggests a balance of sorts, but mainly based on mileage. And for convenience that mainly means fuel.

But then this would be divisive between those in urban centres well served by public options, and those in more rural areas not so blessed.

However, I don't think many involved in this give a hoot about the enviROI, even if they play green all day long, and most certainly are happy to wield it to tackle various iconic areas of public choice that don't fit into their 'some more equal than others' world view. Not all get their taxi travel covered by the taxpayer.

It can only be hoped that those who push too far, and for the wrong reasons, will one day be held to account.

Trouble is, for now all it does is make necessary mitigating options even less popular to be sold in when the time comes.